Real-life story - S

S has a *global learning difficulty and she joined Project Choice after leaving college. She loved her placements, was successful in getting a permanent job and has grown in confidence.  

S
S Domestic services assistant
Employer or university N/A
Salary range Unknown

How I got into the role

When I was at school, I worried about finding somewhere I could work that I would like and where I would feel comfortable, especially the social interaction side of work.  

I felt I needed support, so I chose to do a supported internship with Project Choice (a supported internship programme for young people aged 16 to 24). 

What I do

As part of the project, I had two work placements in the NHS. I did these three days a week and felt as though I was treated like a real employee! I also spent two days a week at college, learning employability skills. 

My final work placement was as a domestic services assistant in a hospital which involved cleaning on the wards. I really enjoyed it, especially talking to the patients and trying to brighten their day.  

I then attended an interview and was successful in getting the job. I worked in that role for a year and then transferred to work in the linen room where I am now.  

I help with packing clean linen such as washed towels, sheets, blankets and gowns which are then distributed around hospital wards and departments.  

I also help deliver the linen and checking what it needed in each area. 

The best bits and challenges

I’m learning important work skills as well as things like how to write my CV and go to an interview.  

I feel my confidence growing each day and I love the independence of leaving for work in the morning on my own.  

Joining Project Choice has been a really good experience. I feel confident and have really come out of my shell.  

I made friends both in work and at college. It’s hard work, but worth it. 

Top tips for others

I love working and now get involved in mentoring new project students which is brilliant. 

 

*S is classed as a vulnerable young person under GDPR so we haven’t used her full name or said where she works or goes to college. 

Make a comment or report a problem with this page

Help us improve Health Careers