Blood sciences

Healthcare science staff working in the blood sciences may collect blood from patients for examination in pathology laboratories, carry out tests on blood to diagnose illness, or ensure that blood from donors is matched so that it can be given to patients when needed.

If you work in blood sciences, you’ll play a crucial role in the diagnosis of illness by helping doctors choose the best type of treatment for patients, and monitoring its effectiveness.

healthcare-science-woman-on-computer-male-with-device

Overview

Haematology is the study of blood and blood-forming tissues. In this area, you’ll play a major role in the diagnosis and monitoring of patients with disorders of the blood and bone marrow, for example:

Working life

Healthcare science staff specialising in the blood sciences will typically be found working in:

If you’re a phlebotomist, you’re a specialised healthcare science assistant or associate who collects blood from patients for examination in pathology laboratories, the results of which provide valuable information to diagnosing illness.

If you work in blood transfusion in hospitals, you’ll ensure that blood from donors is matched so that it can be given to patients when needed, for example during an operation.

If you work for the NHS Blood and Transplant Service, you’ll be involved in the collection, processing and issuing of blood components and investigating difficulties encountered with blood and tissue matching.

Who would I work with?

You will typically be part of a team including healthcare scientists, biomedical scientists, practitioners, healthcare science assistants and associates working in clinical biochemistrygeneticshistocompatibility and immunogenetics, immunology and other related areas.

Want to learn more?

Other roles that may interest you

Is there anything wrong with this page?

Help us improve Health Careers

If you would like us to recontact you about the issue, make sure you are logged in before submitting.