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Decontamination and sterile services

Decontamination science manages all risks associated with health care acquired infections (HCAI) in the reprocessing of reusable medical devices.

Training and qualifications required

For an apprenticeship in decontamination science (with training on the job), A-C grade GCSEs including English, Maths and Science at Grade C or above or an equivalent level 2 vocational qualification. To enter a technician role, you’ll need the IDSc Technical Certificate or NVQ3 Decontamination) or equivalent level of knowledge and experience through decontamination training.

Expected working hours and salary range

Staff in the NHS will usually work a standard 37.5 hours per week. They may work a shift pattern. Staff working as technicians in decontamination sciences/sterile services will be on a salary on AfC band 2 or 3, depending on their role. Managers will be on higher levels. Terms and conditions of service can vary for employers outside the NHS.

Desirable skills and values

Effective team member, ability to work accurately under pressure, have an eye for detail, knowledge of keyboard and computing skills, able to follow clear instructions and work to standard procedures, flexibility, professional manner and good communication skills.

Prospects

With further training and/or experience, you may be able to develop your career further and apply for vacancies as a senior endoscopy decontamination technician, decontamination technician supervisor or manager in a decontamination sciences department. Opportunities also exist in research and in teaching.
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