Working for the NHS in England

We are a world of opportunities. We are the NHS.

The National Health Service (NHS) provides free healthcare to everyone living in England, and is one of the most respected healthcare services in the world.

If you want a rewarding job that will help you progress in your career, then joining us as a nurse is a great opportunity. We work across the country providing the highest standard of care to people of all ages and backgrounds, in lots of different settings — from hospitals to patients' homes.

We are always progressing

With more than 350 roles to choose from, we’re bound to have one that suits you. And once you’re working with us, you’ll be able to develop your skills with on-the-job training and support from senior members of your team. You’ll also have access to a £1,000 professional development fund to help you grow and progress your career.

Starting a new job in England could be a really exciting opportunity for you and we want to make your transition as easy as possible. So we’re here to support you, every step of the way.

Nurses enjoy a competitive salary and have access to great benefits too. 

We use a system called the Agenda for Change which gives you a pay band for your specific job role based on your level of experience and the responsibilities you take on. For example, newly qualified nurses – who’ve registered with the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) start at Band 5 and currently earn £24,907 a year. 
 
NHS pay acknowledges nursing experience and pay increases are linked to the number of years you have worked in the NHS. The average nursing salary is between £33,000 and £35,000 a year. 

But that’s not all. As an NHS employee, you’ll enjoy one of the most generous pension schemes in England.

You’ll also be entitled to: 

  • a standard working week of 37.5 hours.
  • 27 days of holiday per year, plus eight general and public holidays. This increases to 33 days of holiday after ten years of service.
  • extra pay if you work overtime, out-of-hours or shifts.
  • a yearly review to support your career goals and help you to progress.
  • occupational health services to support your physical and mental wellbeing.
  • time off to study for sponsored courses.

You’ll be employed by an NHS trust that looks after the area of England you work in, or the specific area of healthcare you work in. The trust you work for may offer extra benefits such as cycle to work schemes and support with childcare.

Many local shops, restaurants and services offer discounts to NHS staff too, including most gyms and leisure centres. You may also be entitled to discounts and deals on shopping, holidays and financial services.

We have a role for you

There are lots of nursing roles on offer. Find out more about the roles and opportunities available.

We are international

England has a great visa system for international nurses. The Health and Care Visa allows you and your immediate family (spouse and children under 18) to move here. Your children will be able to use the state school system for free, and you and your family will also have free access to healthcare.

England is home to many cultures, including many nurses from around the world who are already working in the NHS. Whether you choose to come on your own or with your family, it’s an easy place to settle and you’ll quickly feel at home. 

There are a number of international nursing associations and groups that support specific communities including the Filipino, Indian and Nigerian communities. To find out more visit the NHS Employers website

You’ll be employed by an NHS trust that looks after the area of England you work in, or the specific area of healthcare you work in. There are several types of NHS trust, including:

We have over 223 trusts in seven different regions. So, whether you want to work in a busy city like London, you’d prefer to settle in the countryside, or you want a life by the sea, there’s bound to be a role and a region that suits your way of life.

No matter where you choose to settle, you’re sure to enjoy all the great benefits of England. Affordable housing, great schools and free healthcare are just some of the advantages of living in England. You’ll also experience a strong sense of community and feel welcomed into the local way of living.

And when you work for the NHS, you’ll be part of a national institution and have access to the world-class training we’re renowned for.

Discover what life is like in each region:
 
●  East of England
●  London 
●  Midlands
●  North East and Yorkshire 
●  North West
●  South East 
●  South West 

  • Nurses who are newly qualified in the NHS and registered with the NMC start at Band 5 and are paid £24,907 a year. 

    NHS pay acknowledges nursing experience and pay increases are linked to the number of years you have worked in the NHS. The average nursing salary is between £33,000 and £35,000 a year. 

  • If you move to England with your immediate family (your spouse and any children under 18), you’ll all have access to our free healthcare system and your children will be able to attend a state school for free.

    England also has a very diverse culture. With a strong community of internationally recruited nurses, you’re sure to feel welcomed from the moment you arrive. There are a number of international nursing associations and groups that support specific communities including the Filipino, Indian and Nigerian communities. To find out more visit the NHS Employers website

    You can find out more about the different support groups and nursing associations on the NHS Employers website.

  • We’ll always support your career ambitions, providing lots of on-the-job training and yearly reviews to discuss your development and what you’d like to achieve. You’ll be employed by a specific NHS trust, working in a certain part of England, but there are plenty of opportunities for you to move roles and regions, and we’ll support you with any moves you’d like to make.

The application process

Find out more about the application process in the UK

The application process
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