Clinical biochemistry

Pathology (the study of disease) includes a number of specialisms, including clinical biochemistry, in which you could help diagnose and manage disease.

In clinical biochemistry, you’ll help to diagnose and manage disease through the analysis of blood, urine and other body fluids.

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Working life

In clinical biochemistry, working as a clinical scientist, you’ll help to diagnose and manage disease through the analysis of blood, urine and other body fluids. You’ll do this by producing and validating the results of chemical and biochemical analyses.

You’ll advise clinicians and GPs on the appropriate use of tests, the interpretation of results, and the follow up investigations that may be required. You will usually be based in a hospital clinical biochemistry/chemical pathology laboratory. Increasingly, you’ll work outside the laboratory to support the investigation of patients at the point of care, including in clinics and operating theatres.  

The typical work activities that you might undertake include:

Who will I work with?

You will work in a team that includes pathologists (medical doctors specialising in the study of disease), biomedical scientists, other healthcare science staff working in the life sciences and other clinicians, including GPs.

Want to learn more?

Other roles that may interest you

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