Learning disability nurse

Learning disability nurses work to provide specialist healthcare and support to people with a learning disability, as well as their families and staff teams, to help them to achieve a fulfilling life. 

This page has information on being a learning disability nurse and links to further information. 

Working life

Children identified as having a learning disability are living longer, more fulfilled lives into adolescence, adulthood and older age, and learning disability nurses play a vital role working across the whole life span in both health and care settings. 

 

The main areas of your role as a learning disability nurse involve

Learning disability nurses may also help people to learn the skills needed to find work. This can be significant in helping them to lead a more independent and healthy life where they can relate to others on equal terms.

Where will you work?

You will be supporting people of all ages with learning disabilities in a range of settings, including:

If you work in a residential setting, you may work shifts to provide 24-hour care. You’ll work as part of a team including GPs, psychologists, social workers, teachers, general practitioners, occupational therapists, speech and language therapists and healthcare assistants.

'Learning disability nursing is quite different to other fields of nursing. It’s about enabling each person to reach their full potential'. Sarah Trute, community behaviour specialist 

Read Sarah's story 

Want to find out more? 

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